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June Forage Share

Field Garlic and Onions (Allium vineale): At this time of year, field garlic and onions are going to seed. The immature seed cloves (shaped like a globe at the top of a scape) can be used like seasoning, just like garlic or onions.

Lamb's Quarters (Chenopodium berlandieri): A delicious, prolific, and nutritious spinach substitute.

Spicebush twigs and leaves (Lindera) : the twigs and leaves of this fragrant bush make excellent tea. Just don't dry them out  - they'll lose their flavor.

Wood Sorrel (Oxalis acetosella): This tender, sour green is a favorite among the youngest foragers. Best eaten raw in a salad, but also makes fantastic pesto or lemonade.

Mulberries (Morus): a sweet, early berry that colors our city streets in purple splotches. Great for snacking on raw, or adding to ice cream, smoothies or granola. Also makes a great pie.

Sweet Cicely/Anise Root (Osmorhiza): a native root that smells and tastes like licorice when injured. Great in any dish or drink that would benefit from some anise-like flavors:

Elderberry flowers (Sambucus): elder flowers, which precede the berries, are fragrant and delicate in taste - great for desserts and drinks. 

Cattail hearts (Typha): a versatile and delicious wild vegetable. At this time of year, the edible parts are the tender centers or hearts of new shoots. Eat them raw or lightly cooked - they taste like a mix of cucumber and squash.

Grape leaves and tails (Vitis): the leaves are great for preserving and stuffing - like dolmas - and the little curly tails the grapes use to climb make a great tart snack or salad addition. 

Common Mallow (Malva neglecta): a very common invasive with edible leaves, flowers, seed pods (called cheeses) and roots. Mallow is nutty and nutritious and acts a bit like okra when cooked (a thickener).

Milkweed buds (Asclepias syriaca) : blanch or steam first to get rid of the bitter latex. Then, treat like you would a broccoli or pickle as a great caper substitute!

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May Forage Share Take Two

Field Garlic (Allium vineale): At this time of year, the most delectable field garlic parts are the scape and bulb (the middle 'chive' section is too tough). Use in place of green garlic. Scapes are especially great grilled, pickled, or pestoed. 

American Groundnut (Apios americana): Starchy tuber that must be cooked. Best peeled, but not a necessary step, especially with the tiny tubers. They also tend to burst open once boiled, making it easy to discard the skin.

Japanese Knotweed - see below

OR Milkweed Shoots (Asciepisa syriaca):

All about Milkweed

Lamb's Quarters (Chenopodium berlandieri): A delicious, prolific, and nutritious spinach substitute.

Garlic Mustard leaves (Alliaria petiolata): The leaves included in this share are extra large and especially great for stuffing like grape leaves. 

Spruce tips - see below

Dame's Rocket flowers (Hesperis matronalis): This pretty, invasive, spicy flower makes a great salad addition

Black Locust flowers (Robinia pseudoacacia): This super ephemeral jasmine-like flower makes amazing ice cream, mead, and so much more.

Stinging Nettles - see below

Monarda leaves - see below

Spicebush twigs and leaves (Lindera) : the twigs and leaves of this fragrant bush make excellent tea. Just don't dry them out  - they'll lose their flavor.

Wood Sorrel (Oxalis acetosella): This tender, sour green is a favorite among the youngest foragers. Best eaten raw in a salad, but also makes fantastic pesto or lemonade.

Chickweed - see below

 

 

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May Forage Share

In the share:

  • Wild Bee Balm (Monarda): Tasted like a spicier oregano. Use as a seasoning, fresh or dried, or grind up into extra potent pesto. Recipes:
  • Field Onions (Allium canadense): A year-round staple, field onions are abundant in just about any local landscape. They can get tough further into the year, but right now are tender and reminiscent of chives. Use green tops as you would chives, small bulbs as you would onions (great pickled), or grill the whole thing. Recipes:
  • Frozen maple sap (Acer saccharum): Tree juice! Maple sap flows in early spring and is most commonly turned into maple syrup. As is, it's mildly sweet and full of minerals, kind of like coconut water. Great as a refreshing summer drink on its own, as a cocktail base, or for making the best coffee. Recipes:

(-OR-)

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Almost ripe.

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Forest Farm Visits: Wild Thyme Farm

in Olympia, Washington. November 2013

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Forest Farm Visits: Mountain Gardens Nursery

in Burnsville, North Carolina. November 2013

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